Keyword: psychotherapy

Can Mood Science Save Us from the Depression Epidemic?

How can it be that—despite all the efforts aimed at understanding, treating, and educating the public about depression—the number of people suffering from depression continues to rise? Why have our treatments plateaued in their effectiveness, and why does the stigma associated with this condition remain very much with us? Depression has clearly been a tough nut to crack, but we haven’t focused much on what’s at the center of that nut: mood.   Read More

Mindfulness Therapy: The New Trauma Treatment?

When we catch ourselves in a state of nonpresence, we’re likely to chalk it up to “mind chatter.” When a client reports these repetitive intrusions, we may wonder about a tendency toward obsessiveness or the possibility of depression and/or anxiety. While all of these interpretations may have some validity, I believe that much more is at stake. I propose that in many of these moments of body-mind intrusion, our brain is trying to protect us from mortal danger arising from memories of old, unresolved threats. In short, we’re in survival mode.   Read More

The Best Practices of Highly Effective Therapists

That therapists differ in their ability to affect change is hardly a revelation. But we also recognize that some practitioners are a cut above the rest. With rare exceptions, whenever they take aim, they hit the bull’s-eye. Nevertheless, since researcher David F. Ricks coined the term supershrinks in 1974 to describe a class of exceptional therapists—practitioners who stood head and shoulders above the rest, little has been done to further the investigation of supershrinks, and pseudoshrinks—those whose clients experience poor results.   Read More

Depression Unmasked

In spite of profound historical changes that make us more vulnerable to depression, the entire mental health establishment still regards the condition much as it did more than two decades ago—as an individual problem, confined within an individual skull, best approached with individual therapies or nostrums. In the face of massive evidence that “individual” depression is really a vast social and cultural problem inextricably linked to the habits, mores, and expectations of our era, our tunnel vision is remarkably unchanged. So why do we continually use a relentlessly individualized remedy to fight a socially mediated disorder?   Read More

Applying Attachment Theory in Schools

Pepperdine professor-psychotherapist Lou Cozolino believes that the key to improving our schools is learning how to incorporate an understanding of attachment theory and social neuroscience into our educational system. Throughout his career, he’s devoted himself to bridging the world of academic research with the realm of practical applications.   Read More

Stress-Reduction Techniques for the Therapist’s Office and Beyond

The sensations of doom or dread and other common panic attack symptoms felt by anxiety sufferers are truly overwhelming. They’re the very same sensations a person would feel if the worst really were happening. What good psychiatrist would suggest skipping medication when a suffering patient can get anxiety relief quickly? But what clients don’t know when they start taking medication is the unacknowledged cost of relying solely on pills: they’ll never learn the basic mind-body stress-reduction techniques that can control or eliminate their symptoms without meds.
  Read More

The Networker Daily Email Takes a Break

A year ago today, we launched the Networker Daily—a blog that we hoped would be a source of digital caffeine for therapists every morning. We wanted to strengthen the sense of connection we already have with you and, along the way, inform, educate, and inspire the whole Networker community with news of the latest happenings in Therapy World. Now it’s 12 months and over 300 blogs later. While we’ve received plenty of fan mail, we’ve also gotten more than a few signals that we’ve provided too much of a good thing.   Read More

Bessel van der Kolk Takes on the New York Times

It’s no secret that psychotherapy has had an image problem in the media. So when The New York Times Magazine asked trauma expert Bessel van der Kolk if it could have a journalist follow him around for a month to observe his work, it seemed like a golden opportunity to present the latest advances in trauma treatment in one of mainstream journalism’s most highly respected forums.   Read More

My Most Spectacular Failure

I will never forget the Correys, who were referred to me by their family doctor in western Nebraska. Every other week for a year, I saw them, during which time I tried pretty much every trick in my therapeutic arsenal. I spent hours discussing their case with trusted colleagues and read up on their particular problems. I don’t know how many nights’ sleep I lost worrying about how to get these folks on the right track. And in spite of all my efforts, the Correys were one of my most spectacular failures.   Read More

Rediscovering the Myth

Poet John O’Donohue’s introduction to the therapy field came through his unlikely friendship with neuropsychiatrist Daniel Siegel, known for his book The Developing Mind and his pathbreaking efforts to help therapists develop an understanding of how the brain develops and changes in response to human relationships. Recalls Siegel, “It seemed to me that he described, in a beautifully poetic way, the human mind in a state of inner coherence or neural integration–which is my subject–and how both solitude and relationship can act in tandem to bring a sense of mental and emotional wholeness.”   Read More


 

Enter Your Log In Credentials

Change Password

×
.